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Lessons from Pittsburgh: Downtown Development

posted on: Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Brian Kurtz, Director of Research at the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership, presented at the Sally Carlow Kohler Lecture Series of the Erie County Historical Society. On Wednesday, May 28th, Brian shared with a roomful of artists, administrators, funders and community members on the success of downtown Pittsburgh development. Projects using arts, culture and entrepreneurship  have changed the vibrancy of the downtown district and have impacted the way hundreds of thousands of visitors and residency view and interact with the space.

Click here to see Brian's presentation for further details and photos of the projects the Downtown Pittsburgh Partnership in collaboration with Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council have implemented.

More on the Sally Carlow Kohler Lecture Series here.


Barber National Institute to Host Professional Development Workshop

posted on: Thursday, April 10, 2014

Erie Arts & Culture will partner with the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, VSA Pennsylvania, the Barber National Institute and the Kennedy Center, to offer a professional development workshop. "Teaching the Arts to Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder" will offer practical teaching strategies for students on the autism spectrum.

 


The workshops will be held on: 
  • Monday, April 21, 2014

Click here to view a list of other VSA Workshops occurring in Pennsylvania.

The workshop will be a full day from 8:30 am to 3:30 pm (Registration opens at 8:00 am) and include the following topics:

  • An overview of characteristics of Autism, Asperger’s Syndrome and other pervasive Developmental Disabilities;
  • Strategies for using Universal Design for Learning to allow greater access to the curriculum for children with ASD;
  • Strategies for behavior management;
  • Hands on arts infused lesson plans; and
  • Best practices in assessment.

The workshop implements standards-based professional development training for educators and/or teaching artists to improve skills in teaching the arts to students with ASD pre-K through grade 12. Six Act 48 credits are available.

Workshop instructors include Judy Stewart, Critical Skills Specialist at the Barber National Institute, Anne Ellison, Behavior Analyst at the Barber National Institute and Tom Ferraro, professional fine artist and teaching artist. Techniques include lecture, discussion, collaborative group activities and art exercises.

The workshop is open to arts educators, teaching artists, administrators and special education professionals. Parents and other advocates are welcome to attend. A fee of $35 covers the cost of breakfast and lunch for participants. Six Act 48 credits are available. Registration deadline April 14th. Click here to register.


Artist Residency at Wayne Elementary

posted on: Thursday, March 20, 2014

Artist teaches Erie students more than creativity

Originally posted here.

BY ERICA ERWIN, Erie Times-News 
erica.erwin@timesnews.com
Artist in residence Saihou Njie, center, talks with Wayne School sixth-grader DeShawn Gavin, 12, right, in Erie on March 13. Gavin was explaing to the class how he made his orange sculpture, left, to reflect heroic traits. GREG WOHLFORD//ERIE TIMES-NEWS

The character was a mix of cardboard, plaster and paint and fabric.

But it stood for something much more substantial: courage and patriotism.

Marques Beeman's father survived a shooting, an event that rocked the sixth-grader and caused him to think about those who display courage and patriotism by putting their lives on the line regularly.

The end result was a character designed during a residency at Wayne School with Saihou Njie, a renowned artist and humanitarian from Pittsburgh.

Through a grant from Erie Arts & Culture, Njie has been working for six weeks as an artist-in-residence with Marques and other sixth-graders at Wayne. Their work has centered around the district's Medal of Honor character development program and the virtues of courage, commitment, citizenship, integrity, patriotism and sacrifice.

Students were asked to use iPads to write stories of a fictitious heroic character who exhibited one of those virtues. Working with Njie, they then created a three-dimensional model of the character using plaster strips, cardboard, newspaper and clay.

"It's important to engage the children in their learning," said Holly Nowak, program director for Erie Arts & Culture. "It's important because it makes learning a fun place to be again."

During a recent class, the students used iPads to take photos of their character from different angles to include in their stories.

Marques's character is covered in what looks like tie-dyed fabric.

"It inspires me to do things," said Marques, who also writes and draws comic books. "If it was a real person, it would be real courageous and help people a lot. That's what I imagine about it."

Njie is a native of Gambia, West Africa, who specializes in photography and working with batik fabrics. Art is the vehicle that can connect people to each other, to the wider world and to the six virtues of the Medal of Honor program, he said.

"I don't come into the room to teach English or build someone's vocabulary," Njie said. "I want to build the person. I want to work with young minds and nudge them in a direction that I think would be OK."

Some of the lesson is about art, but much of it is not, at least not directly.

"It's about what you're going to do to help mankind be better," Njie told the students during a recent class. "Be in school. Stay in school. Respect your teachers. Do your homework. Do what's expected of you.

"Once you have your education, the world is open to you."

ERICA ERWIN can be reached at 870-1846 or by e-mail. Follow her on Twitter at twitter.com/ETNerwin.

Ten Questions with Todd Scalise

posted on: Tuesday, February 04, 2014

Todd Scalise is a Erie native and an Erie artist. After living, studying and working around the US and Europe, he’s back in his hometown innovating new applications for art and design with his business Higherglyphics. Higherglyphics are unique Visual Public Relations opportunities that “combine art and manufacturing with project management, installation, and merchandising.” You can see his work in the Perry 200 campaign, the Erie Art Museum, on the HANDS building on 7th and State Street, and at the Erie Skate Park. Read on to learn more about the 2013 Bruce Morton Wright Artist of the Year.
Photos courtesy of Todd Scalise

THE ART

1.) What made you want to become an artist?

I have always been an artist. It’s one of those things I didn’t really get to decide; I have had an instinct to create ever since I could hold something in my hand. Drawing was my first art form and my refuge throughout my childhood. My older sister Nancy was really good at drawing so I began by drawing what she drew. Through out school I was encouraged to draw more so I got that spark for art as a kid and it propelled me into my career choices.

2.) What inspires you?

Anything can trigger inspiration; the more random, the better. A part of my creative practice is trying to see the connections between seemingly unrelated source materials. A gum wrapper or a piece of junk mail might have something in it that interests me so I end up drawing those things. Another strategy is that sometimes I wait for things to find me. Meaning, I’ll take a walk down the street, go by the Dollar Store and see some funky sneakers with a really crazy color palette and decide that’s what I’m going to use for my next painting. Art making takes a lot of daydreaming. You have to be loose and open and be around people that allow you to operate like that.

3.) Can you describe your work?

Currently, my art is about personal expression and the various ways to apply that expression. Because my focus is to explore different ways of utilizing art, my art takes on various forms ranging from exhibition art to merchandise design and community art projects. I’m a visual artist with drawing and painting as the basis for what I do. This translates into almost anything you can create. I make art commercially but I’m not a commercial artist. When I create for a client, I call it Visual Public Relations. When an organization needs exposure, I accomplish that with a great piece of art that reflects their brand. In turn, that generates a lot of attention and earned media for the organization.

4.) What are some of your upcoming projects?

I am currently working on the art direction for the next Best Summer Night concert series, which featured Crosby, Stills and Nash two years ago. This spring I will be creating a large-scale mural for the downtown YMCA and finishing the Erie Skate Park mural project. Also, I am excited about launching my online business, Mosaix, which is a retail web site that enables anyone to create their own wallpaper and other vinyl products with their art. 

5.) What prepared you most for your success?

The combination of my parent’s influence, seeking people that I would like to be more like, and 10 years moving around a lot had something to do with where I am today. My parents are the classic American self-starters who did well by forming their own business. I think it takes a lot of creativity to do that no matter what profession you are in. I have been fortunate to go to good schools and be around great artists. For whatever reason, every community I go to, I run into the top people. But the essential element is that I have never stopped making art since I was a child so I have a huge body of work to always pull from.

6.) What are your goals as an artist?

Artists in the 20th century artists primarily focused on their individual voice but I want to create beyond the expression of just one individual. It is time for an evolutionary shift towards the collective so naturally finding new applications for art will be something quintessentially 21st century. This will entice people to become more creative and stimulate higher-level thinking, which results in better problem solving.

THE PLACE

7.) How did you establish yourself as an artist in Erie?

When I returned to Erie in 2010, my first to Visual Public Relations opportunity was for the Annex Stairwell Project at the Erie Art Museum. This project is a 1,200 sq. ft. mural and merchandising project licensed and designed exclusively for the Erie Art Museum. The stairwell is the main point of entry at the museum for anyone taking classes, faculty, staff, and donors. It was an eyesore before I was invited in 2010 by the museum’s director, John Vanco, to “do something” to the stairwell. I spent 18 months working on the project as I developed my business model for Higherglyphics. It was a great primer for learning how to raise capital for large-scale community art projects and how to merchandise my art. Merchandising is important because I want everyone to be able to afford my art. The benefit to my clients is the merchandise provides a residual stream of revenue for their organizations. I am a premier member of the StartUp Incubator, so with the help of Donna Douglass I received help and encouragement while developing my launch project at the Erie Art Museum.


8.) What are some of the challenges you feel creative people in Erie face?

There are not enough outlets and opportunities for the large creative population here in Erie. Also, I think we still need more precedent for the utilization of creative capital here in our community. However, it is up to the artists to do what they are good at and create the opportunities, not only for themselves but for our community, otherwise we tend to gravitate towards the same solutions for old problems. For me, I knew I could make art. I worked hard to have that part of the equation figured out. But having the art is not the hard part; that’s the fun and easy part. The hard part is creating an opportunity with the art that benefits others. Like any other profession, artists in Erie need a resource for professional development. This way the community will be better able to fully exploit this powerful human resource.

9.) What is your vision for the arts in Erie?

It’s about combining community art with manufacturing for public spaces, simple as that. Erie has the potential to be an arts destination similar to Chautauqua but the potential is greater for regional and national impact. Our community is set up for manufacturing so instead of lamenting about ‘how things used to be’, we should be developing ways to merge our creative resources with our manufacturing capability. The residual effect would be something for the community to rally behind, much like the Perry 200 Commemoration.

THE HYPOTHETICAL

10.) If it’s dawn, and martial law will be instated in 24 hours, how would you spend your day?

A perfect application for Visual Public Relations! I would prepare for the inevitable, bunker myself and make sure I had everything I need. After, I would create a poetic expression addressed to the proper authorities: a manifesto on a prominent wall explaining the temporary nature of the situation. Hopefully, there would be enough people to counteract and naturally balance things. It would be important to sight specific instances in history of similar coups that have failed. I would express this in a beautiful, but aggressive, written wall piece. Luckily, those types of hypothetical situations are not the only opportunities for an artist with something to say.

You can see community art projects by Todd Scalise at www.higherglyphics.com


ArtsErie Artists in Residence with Kids as Curators

posted on: Thursday, January 23, 2014

Article by Lindsey Poisson, lindsey.poisson@timesnews.com
Originally posted on GoErie.com

It's the kind of art that takes grown-ups by surprise.


But give it a second. Soon, the rainbow of stuffed animals, a ziggurat built from cardboard and cathedrals made of Lego pieces, jewelry and other materials on display for the 10th annual Kids as Curators exhibit will start to make a lot of sense.

"It's like walking through the brain of a 13-year-old," said Kelly Armor, director of education and folk art at the Erie Art Museum. "It's a great exhibit for the community and for families."

The projects will be on display starting Saturday at the Erie Art Museum, 20 E. Fifth St., and will continue through March 23. Three schools are selected each year to create the exhibit, which incorporates kids' collections into interactive displays with different themes. For this year's project, students visited the Art Museum to learn about exhibits, then teamed up with local artists to plan and build their projects.

Students at St. George School were inspired by angles and constructed cathedrals. Sixth-graders at West End Elementary School in Meadville used stuffed animals to make a rainbow.

At Emerson-Gridley Elementary School, about 75 sixth-graders built a replica of an ancient Mesopotamian temple known as a ziggurat. Coming up with such a unique idea was the easy part -- thinking the project through, from start to finish, was the most challenging learning experience for students, said Deborah Sementelli, Emerson-Gridley's artist-in-residence during the project.

"What are you going to do? How are you going to put it together? You have to think about this," she said. "So we did some planning, and they did the work."

The students collected recyclable and used materials -- including paper-towel tubes, empty cereal boxes and film from old VHS tapes -- and spent about two months researching, measuring and constructing their project.

"We all just got our minds together and built it together," said sixth-grader Joshua Hall, 11. "I just liked having fun and learning new things about building and being an artist."

Hopefully, art lovers will enjoy seeing the ziggurat on display at the museum, too.

"I hope they want to do more research about it and see what is it, what does it stand for, what happened there," said sixth-grader Ajaray Ellis, 11. "Maybe they'll do more social studies."

Kids love stuff, Armor said. And the idea behind the Kids as Curators exhibit is to show students how art museums are just huge collections of interesting stuff.

"If you can make a connection between those two things, then kids get excited about the museum in a way they might not have felt before," she said. For the past decade, the exhibit has done just that. When young museum patrons see the exhibit, they instantly light up, Armor said.

"It's like watching a bunch of art-history grad students at the Louvre," she said. "They immediately connect with it."


LINDSEY POISSON can be reached at 870-1871 or by e-mail. Follow her on Twitter at twitter.com/ETNpoisson.


Shop Local & Handmade for the Holidays

posted on: Tuesday, November 19, 2013

The holidays are approaching and it can be a stressful time full of expectations and too few hours in the day. The holidays are also full of some of the warmest and most joyous moments I experience throughout the year.

If one thing's for certain, 'tis the season for shopping. The economy and retailers nationwide are in high gear to meet the demand of shoppers. This year, use your holiday spending to support local and handmade.


Beginning this Sunday, November 24th

Fall Harvest Craft Fair at PACA, 1505 State Street, Sunday November 24th, 10 am-3 pm

Admission if free, but please consider bringing a non perishable food item to donate to local food pantries.

Join us and shop for home made Baked Goods, Crafts, Wreaths, Tie dyes, Hula Hoops, Aprons, Crocheted Items and Jewelry.

On Black Friday, November 29th


Made in Erie Marketplace at the Masonic Temple, 32 W 8th Street, Friday November 29th, 4 pm-8 pm

Skip the lines at the mall and join us for our first-ever Made In Erie Marketplace! Sponsored by Civitas, this Green Friday event will showcase locally made goods, local food, and local culture. The marketplace, to be held in the Masonic Temple Camelot Room, will feature: 

- Dozens of vendors selling goods made right here in Erie – from jewelry, to ceramics, to homemade honey
- Entertainment by Julio Quezada & Friends
- Open mic poetry readings by spoken word artists from Poets' Hall
- Food and beverages by Erie Mobile Kitchen

Admission is $3 and free for children 12 and under. 100% of ticket sales to be donated to charity.

Get the word out. Shop local and support Erie's entrepreneurs and small local businesses!

Friday, December 13th


10th Annual Holiday Show and Sale, Center City Arts, 138 E 26th St, Friday December 13th, 5 pm-8 pm

One of a kind gifts and original works of art including: Fused Glass, Jewelry, Painting, and Decorative Gourds. We are excited to announce a new collaboration with the Multicultural Community Resource Center adding a World Market featuring local artisans from more than 8 different cultures. 

Join us at the most unique venue in town- our stunning studio in the historic Rose Koehler Curtze estate at 26th & Holland.

Center City Arts creates opportunities for local artisans to earn income by bringing their products and their stories to the community.





The Value of Creativity in Education

posted on: Friday, October 18, 2013

The following excerpts are reposted from:

"The Creativity Imperative" by Jessica Roake for Education UpdateOctober 2013

Success in the modern world demands innovation, complex problem solving, and new ways of understanding: it requires creativity. Leaders in nearly every profession list creativity as the most valuable asset in their field, but also complain about the lack of creativity in America's young workforce. In response, states including California and Massachusetts have developed creativity and innovation education indexes to measure how schools are fostering creativity, and the education community has contributed innovative pedagogy on the importance of creativity.

Misunderstood Potential 

"Creative" is often the adjective that teachers assign to students who seem daydreamy, distracted, or disruptive: traditionally negative attributes in the classroom. Yet, studies consistently show that daydreamers score higher on tests of creativity and distracted students are seven times more likely to be "eminent creative achievers," according to researchers Shelley Carson, Jordan Peterson, and Kathleen Smith.

Even when "creative" is not used as a negative signifier by teachers, it remains a challenging concept. According to Susan Brookhart, author of How to Assess Higher Order Thinking Skills in Your Classroom, "Many teachers want their students to be creative but are not entirely sure what to look for. Too often, creativity ends up meaning the report cover was nicely colored or something like that."

So What Is Creativity?

One of the trickiest aspects of successfully integrating creativity into one's teaching is defining it in practical terms. Thomas Crowley, who teaches at San Diego's Francis Parker School, says, "Creativity is a process of problem solving that leads to the aesthetic. Creative thinking is the ability to innovate pre-existing ideas and understandings in a novel, sometimes inventive, way."

Anthony Cody, a longtime Oakland, Calif., science teacher and consultant, adds, "Creative thinking is when, rather than simply following directions, we think for ourselves and come up with new ways  to look at problems. It means we are bringing our personal insights and experiences to bear, and actively investigating, rather than just following predetermined steps. It means using ideas or metaphors from other disciplines and thinking about things in new ways."

Although a surprising number of teachers believe that creativity is innate, "the good news," Ashley Merryman, coauthor of NurtureShock: New Thinking About Children, notes, "is that creativity is a skill that can be taught."

Encouraging Creativity in the Classroom

There are innumerable ways to create new and vibrant understandings for students through creative activities and approaches to subject matter. Among them:

  • Brainstorming in any subject: The purpose of brainstorming is to generate ideas. Not judge them.
  • Changing the environment: Setting up space for exploration in the classroom - whether through manipulatives centers, discussion corners, drama stages, or art tables - promotes creativity and revives tired minds.
  • Exposing students to new cultures: This not only broadens students' perspectives, but it also shows them that there is more than one way to approach a situation and find solutions.
  • Thinking Visually: Organizing, interpreting, and synthesizing knowledge visually helps students see connections and process ideas in new ways.
  • Encouraging creative synthesis in project-based learning: As an example, after Crowley teaches his students about 20th century warfare and shares examples of artistic responses to war, he asks them to produce an art piece, in any medium, that addresses one of the major themes of modern war. In addition to demonstrating their critical understanding of historical conflicts, the project requires the students to explore their own perspective (students can memorialize, glorify, or criticize warfare) creatively. Projects are accompanied by artistic statements that explain their intent and process, and the students view and critique one another's work in a culminating gallery event.
  • Using technology: There are many apps (photo editing, sketching, painting, etc.) that encourage the kind of divergent thinking skills that creative learners need to assemble information differently.
  • Drawing connections: Free yourself from rigid subject-matter borders and encourage students to forge unexpected connections. Shawn Cornally, instructor at Solon High School and the Big Ideas School in Iowa, describes this in action. "It's like a student who thinks to use a mathematical n-gram statistic to compare works of Shakespeare for uses of a specific kind of irony."

    For anyone looking to bring more than a dash of creativity into their classrooms or if parents are interested in learning about in-depth professional and educational artistic experiences for their children, ArtsErie offers artist in residence services for schools and community organizations.

    Take a look at some of the work the artists and teachers at Union City Elementary are doing with this semester's residency:


A Letter from Our Executive Director

posted on: Thursday, September 26, 2013

For many of you, this issue of the ArtsErie newsletter will introduce you to the quiet work that has been progressing between ArtsErie and the Erie Downtown Arts & Culture Coalition (EDA&CC)to create one strong, backbone organization for arts and culture. 

Since last spring, the leadership of both organizations has been actively exploring a merger. Instead of focusing on what we’ve grown to do over time, we started with a blank slate. We explored local data and Erie County’s cultural plan to better understand our current community needs. We engaged staff and volunteers to help us explore the strengths and weaknesses of our organizations and identify successful models within our field. We evaluated our role in advancing arts and culture and our current capacity. The process, while consuming and uncomfortable at times (as any real change is) has been rewarding. We’ve taken time to listen and learn from one another, we’ve rebuilt trust and together, we’ve defined a shared vision for arts and culture in the Erie Region.

Just as a new work of art evolves from concept to creation and then again through appreciation and interpretation, so do organizations. To serve our community well, our organization must be introspective - aware of our own strengths and weaknesses, reflective of the dynamic needs of our stakeholders, flexible in our approach and efficient with our resources. We must embrace a process of continual improvement. Letter from the Executive Director.

At our inception as the Arts Council of Erie in 1960, our founders could not have imagined the changes to our way of life, new forms of artistic expression, population and audience trends or the challenges that our community would face in 2013. We’ve had to evolve with the changing world around us to remain relevant.

We are not alone. At the 2013 Americans for the Arts Conference in Pittsburgh this past June, it was evident that as arts councils we are being challenged to think differently about our role. Once dedicated to building arts infrastructure, today’s arts councils are valuable partners in discussions on educational improvement, tourism, skill building for the 21st Century, placemaking and health and healing. We advocate for equity and accessibility, give voice to the unheard and inspire the creativity needed to fuel innovation. We are in the business of personal and community improvement through arts and culture.

We need your help. We’re asking you to add your voice to this process. On page 10, you’ll find information about a stakeholder survey. Your participation is important. Please take a few minutes to share your input by following the instructions provided. Over the next months, we will meet with stakeholders to share our progress and receive additional feedback. Your input will help us refine this important work. We hope to celebrate the launch of the integrated organization at the 2013 Fall for Arts and Culture Appreciation Awards on October 29th! Please save the date and plan to join us.

Thank you for your support throughout the evolution of the Arts Council of Erie. I’m very excited to be a part of an organization boasting both the strength of history and great promise for the future! 



To read our full Fall 2013 Imagine Newsletter, click here.

Investing in Early Childhood Education

posted on: Tuesday, July 30, 2013


On July 29th, 2013 the Economic Research Institute of Erie at Behrend College held its 11th annual conference. This year’s theme was the economic impact of early childhood education. The work of Dr. Timothy Bartik of the Upjohn Institute sparked the inspiration to raise dialog on this issue in Erie.
Research shows the value of early childhood (birth to age 5) education. Those with the opportunity to begin education before preschool usually have better test scores, attendance rates, more soft (social skills), and attain higher levels of education leading to higher wages earned during their lifetime. Beyond the benefit to the individual, the truly provocative points made at the conference were the real economic value and long term benefits to the community at large.

Investing in early childhood education has incredible benefits for kids and their futures, but it is also 
early prevention for social and behavioral problems, reduces welfare costs and crime and increases the number of citizens with excellent job and interpersonal skills who work well with others.

Some successful programs that offer opportunities for early education are PNC’s Grow Up Great, Young at Art Museum and Keystone Stars. ArtsErie’s arts in education program partners with South Hills Child Development Center and teaching artist Siobhan Walsh to infuse dance and movement into early childhood learning for a creative way to teach culture and language.


The arts are particularly important in early childhood education in their potential for engagement and how they transcend language and communication barriers. A major component of a quality early childhood education program is play, stated Nancy Kalista of Early Connections during  the conference’s panel discussion. And what is art if not play? Creative and experimental opportunities provided during arts experiences are essential in the development of soft and fine motor skills of young children.

For more information, check out Dr. Bartik’s research and the PA Early Learning Investment Commission.


Technology and Arts Infused Education

posted on: Thursday, July 18, 2013

ArtsErie's Arts in Education Learning Lab session will highlight technology infusion in arts residencies




Many children navigate effortlessly between the worlds of digital technology, the arts and other areas of learning. In the Arts in Education Program, we have been considering how technology-mediated residencies unlock opportunities for multisensory communication and expression in conjunction with areas such as dramatization, debate, movement, dialogue, video and storytelling. How do we encourage children and develop sophisticated pathways and approaches to learning with technology? One way is to develop equally sophisticated teaching strategies grounded in effective practices in educational technology. 

The “TPACK” (or Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge) framework created by Punya Mishra and Matthew Koehler, is an approach to integrating technology into learning experiences. As a tool, it helps us to consider the expert knowledge that is needed in considering the intersection between technology, pedagogy and content. When these three areas are considered together, technology integration strategies become more aligned with how teachers and teaching artists plan educational experiences, rather than simply designing instruction around the use of randomly chosen technology tools.



How can learning activities be developed that appropriately incorporate technologies, while also addressing educational goals? Also, how can teachers and teaching artists choose among the many educational technologies available, such as arts-related software, Web 2.0 tools, and mobile apps? These questions will be addressed Monday, August 12 at the 3rd annual Arts in Education Learning Lab as Jude Shingle and I will present, “Exploring Technology Infusion in Oompa-Loompa Land: Developing Technological, Pedagogical and Arts-Infused Content Knowledge.” During this session we will address the role of technology in arts-infused residencies as we guide participants through the TPACK framework and how to use the TPACK activity types when considering technology-infused learning.

Register for the Learning Lab today!


Camille Dempsey is the Technology and Visual Arts Specialist in the Art in Action Project. As a Staff Development Consultant, she works with various school districts, non-profits and in small business. Prior to her current work, she served as the Art Education Program Director and an Assistant Professor of Art at Mercyhurst University. Camille has also worked as a K-12 art educator in Pennsylvania, Connecticut and New York City.

She is also a doctoral candidate in Instructional Technology at Duquesne University. Her dissertation explores the concept of “virtuality culture” as a theoretical expansion of  Walter Ong’s work in the areas of orality and literacy culture. Her educational background also includes study at Teachers College Columbia University (MA in Art & Art Education), University of Pennsylvania & Pennsylvania Academy of The Fine Arts (BFA) and Edinboro University (School Leadership studies).